Wonderful Wording at the Blue Pig Tavern in Cape May

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Our recent visit to the Blue Pig Tavern in Cape May (make that two visits, since we just had to have that awesome, farm-fresh breakfast again!) revealed a wonderful inspiration: the wording on the placemats. Get this: on the bottom corner of the delightful, soft blue-toned menu says, “A report of any indifference or inattention will be appreciated as a favor by the management.” Isn’t that fantastic?! It’s such an elegant throwback to the days of propriety, to the rich history of Cape May, which brings to mind images of well-mannered families dressed for breakfast, and manners still mattering.

On my husband’s menu (and yes, I took them both home with us, so that I could get this post just right!) it says, “In the event of any item not proving entirely satisfactory, we will be favored to have Patrons direct our attention to their requirements.” I am swooning! We will be favored! I love that!

This is definitely wording you’ll want to copy for your wedding menu cards, to impress your guests with your own elegance and propriety.

Thanks, Blue Pig Tavern, for that wonderful return to the past, and for bringing a little taste of polite times to our modern era!

Freebie! Ways to Honor Family and Friends at Your Wedding: Part 5: Including Kids

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Want to honor the little ones at your wedding? Here’s a freebie excerpt from my ebook to inspire you:

Including Kids

  1. Allow the kids to have some say in what they’ll wear. Your little nieces can perhaps pick out the style of floral headband they’d like to wear, or choose the shade of pink for their dress sash. Kids love it when adults listen to them, and ask their opinion, and they’ll be happier at dress-up time when they know they helped design their own style.
  2. As they walk down the aisle, have kids carry a cute sign, perhaps saying, “Here Comes the Bride” or as a surprise to the groom: “She’s on her way!”
  3. Write fabulous wedding vows to your kids, if you or your groom have them. Promise to love and guide them, protect them and support their dreams. You might even give them their own special piece of jewelry to commemorate your becoming a family.
  4. In your wedding décor, display photos of you with the kids, so that they’re on the table filled with wedding portraits from your relatives. They love to be included, especially if they’re your own kids.
  5. Before the wedding, tell kids that they’ll get to ‘style’ a wedding photo of you with them. They can then practice with you in different, funny poses like jumping in the air or making silly faces. Post-ceremony, it’ll take no time at all for your photographer to snap this special kid-planned photo, and they’ll feel very proud of getting to decide on an ‘official’ wedding photo.
  6. Be sure to hit the photo booth with all the kids, in a group to make it go faster. Kids notice if you step into the booth with your own nieces and neglect to do so with your groom’s nieces. So be sure to give all kids equal photo time.
  7. Let the kids choose the song that will play as they’re introduced into the room at the start of the reception. It helps to give little ones two or three songs to choose from, or else you’ll have a tough time, and they may keep changing their minds. Tweens and teens can name their own fun song for their entrance, if you’d like to set them apart from the bridal party or have a lot of junior bridesmaids and junior groomsmen.

Get more freebie ideas from my book The Bride’s Guide to Freebies.

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Newly-Engaged? Here’s the First Thing You Should Do

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An important part of planning your wedding is knowing what you DON’T want, which clears away the clutter and all those suggestions from other people, allowing you both to get clear about what you DO want.
And talking together about your Don’ts gets you communicating about what’s most important for your wedding day.
So print out and use the following worksheets as an essential part of your planning process…
[Plus, it makes life easier when you can hand these worksheets  to your vendors!]

Click on the links below to download the lists

What the Bridesmaids Don’t Want For Their Dresses
What We Don’t Want For the Wedding Cake
What We Don’t Want In Our Ceremony
What We Don’t Want For Flowers and Décor
Foods We Don’t Want Served at the Wedding

What We Don’t Want for the Honeymoon
Songs We Don’t Want Played At the Wedding
What We Don’t Want For Our Wedding Vows
What I Don’t Want For My Wedding Gown

Visit my site www.sharonnaylor.net for more free worksheets to get your wedding planning started off right!

A New Wedding Trend for Grooms Spotted at the NBA Draft! The Nerlens Noel Inside-the-Jacket Sign

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Image via ESPN

Last night, I was watching the NBA Draft, and never thought I’d spot a new wedding trend for grooms, but there was Nerlens Noel holding open his jacket to show off his college colors and number! And he was the second player to do the inside-the-jacket sign! So there you have it, grooms, a pro-athlete-inspired new wedding trend: the inside of your tux or suit jacket can be customized to show off your choice of message!

Wedding Planning First Step: Your FREE Excerpt of “Your Wedding Your Way”

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It’s time for another free excerpt of one of my top new wedding books! This time, using this freebie from my book Your Wedding Your Way, you and your groom will talk about the basics for your Big Day, just to get your style set, and combine your wishes.

 

Chapter 2

How to Decide What You Both Want for Your Wedding Day

 You both have to be in agreement on the various ways you will create your wedding your way. The best way to get in agreement is to talk about everything. Here’s a little quiz to get the discussion started. Take this quiz together, and use different-colored pens to check off your answers and make additional notes. Don’t worry if you’re not in total agreement right now—few wedding couples are at this stage. You’ve already gone through the checklist in the introduction about why you’d like to have a nontraditional wedding, and now you’re getting in a little deeper.

 

1.         How comfortable are you when you’re at formal celebrations, such as black-tie weddings and dress-up events?

            a.         Very comfortable. I love getting dressed up, looking my best, and enjoying “the good life” at formal weddings.

            b.         Somewhat comfortable. Being in high heels or a suit is fine for the first few hours, but then I’d rather be home in pajamas, watching television.

            c.         I hate it. Nothing’s worse than being forced to wear high heels or a suit just because someone wants everyone to look good in their pictures.

2.         What’s the best location for your wedding?

            a.         Right here in our hometown, which is going to be gorgeous at the time of year we’re getting married, and it’s close for all our guests to get to.

            b.         It would be dreamy if we could get married at our favorite vacation destination that we go to every year, get married on the beach at sunset, and have foods from our favorite restaurants there.

            c.         Someplace we’ve never been before, like our dream destination ofHawaii. And to bring everyone else with us? That would be amazing.

            d.         Someplace not in our hometown, but also not a five-hour flight away, either.

3.         How do you feel about an outdoor wedding?

            a.         It’s perfect! Nothing says “wedding” more than gorgeous scenery, everyone in the gardens, surrounded by flowers.

            b.         I’d be too worried about the weather and bugs ruining the day.

            c.         I’m all for it if the place we book has an indoor ballroom we could move into if it rains.

            d.         I’ve always hated outdoor parties. Who wants to bring sunblock to a wedding and sweat through her dress?

4.         What is the worst part of a traditional wedding?

            a.         Having the same old food.

            b.         Having the same old music.

            c.         It’s expensive no matter how you plan it.

            d.         Having to go by the rules of a church or reception hall.

5.         How important is it for you to invite everyone you know to the wedding?

            a.         Very important. It wouldn’t be a wedding without all our relatives and their kids, and all our friends there.

            b.         Not too important. I’d be happy with just a small circle of close relatives and friends.

            c.         I really don’t care, as long as we get married.

6.         How do you feel about a wedding being funny, having laugh-out-loud moments?

            a.         That makes it great! Our guests would love it, so we’re going to insert some humor in the ceremony and in the emcee’s wording at the reception.

            b.         That would offend our parents and other relatives.

            c.         I think weddings should be solemn and serious—funny toasts and the like should be done at the rehearsal dinner only.

            d.         We’re all for it if any toast-makers want to be funny, but we’re not going to plan special comedy moments for our big day.

 

You’ve just discussed some basic, fundamental issues as you co-create your personalized wedding day. These questions may have even sent you off on tangents, discussing your thoughts and suggestions for your dream-wedding day, planned your way! Notice there’s no “scoring,” no “if you circled mostly B, then . . .” rules. This exercise was just to get the discussion on the table. Take notes on every inspiration that arises as you work through this section. Some ideas will work and some won’t, but that’s the creative process.